Social Etiquette

Potty Training in restaurant

Manners Monday: What is Etiquette?

Photo Credit: Kimberly Decker Anyone with children can tell you that potty training can be stressful, especially when leaving the house.  You pack extra underwear, make frequent stops at the bathroom, observe your child to see if they are doing the “pee pee dance” but, never ever would I think of taking their port-a-potty with me. Unfortunately, not everyone feels the same way.   Case in point.  As reported by Jennifer Stagg of KSL 5 News in Utah, “A young mother of [...]

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Upcoming Workshop – Wine Etiquette: 5 Tips For Enjoying a Glass of Wine

“Wine is bottled poetry” – Robert Louis Stevenson  Although wine is used for religious and ceremonial purposes, many are intimidated with certain aspects of the total wine experience. In this 45-minute workshop we will cover holding the glass to ordering a bottle of wine in a restaurant and everything in-between Join me for: Wine Etiquette: 5 Tips For Enjoying a Glass of Wine Here are a few of the topics that will be covered: Which glass to use and how to hold it Simple wine [...]

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Greek Athlete Voula Papachristou_Social Media Etiquette

Twitter Etiquette: There’s No Medal for Stupidity

Voula Papachristou, a Greek triple jumper, has been expelled from the 2012 Olympic Games because of a racist joke she posted on Twitter, as well as expressing support for a far-right political party. She tweeted “‘With so many Africans in Greece, at least the West Nile mo dog food pro plan squitoes will eat home made food!”  The Hellenic Olympic Committee also banned all Greek athletes from using social media for personal opinions not related to the Olympics and their competitions. The Greek triple [...]

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The national tourism agency has developed a comprehensive online resource to guide everyone from hoteliers to cab drivers in offering the best customer service and meeting 'cultural' needs. It offers advice ranging from how to pour wine for Argentinians to not winking at people from Hong Kong. The big no-no is asking a Canadian what part of America they come from. Exuberant welcome VisitBritain says the UK is already rated fairly highly - 14th out of 50 - in the Nation Brands Index for the quality of the welcome would-be visitors believe they will get when they come here. But key competitors such as Canada, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands do better. Our great landmarks won't be enough to keep tourists happy, say VisitBritain. The VisitBritain research shows foreign visitors often find Britain's mix of cutting-edge modernity and rich cultural heritage ''fascinating'' and ''exciting.'' They see British people as ''honest,'' ''funny,' ''kind'' and ''efficient'' but in some cases they wish we offered a more exuberant welcome. The tips have been written by VisitBritain staff, who are natives of the countries featured, and they have a wealth of insight into the places visitors come from. Here is a sample: · A smiling Japanese person is not necessarily happy The Japanese tend to smile when angry, embarrassed, sad or disappointed. They may think it rude if you talk to them with your hands in your pockets. Avoid staring, as eye contact isn't generally considered polite. While sitting, try not to show the bottom of your shoes. Avoid being late for things and blowing your nose in front of someone is also likely to be considered rude. · Be careful how you pour wine for an Argentinian The whole process involves a number of social taboos and unless you understand them you could insult someone. For example, pouring wine backwards into a glass indicates hostility. Don't be offended by Argentinian humour, which may mildly attack your clothing or weight. · Avoid winking at someone from Hong Kong Winking is often considered a rude gesture. Pointing with an index finger is not advisable as this is generally used only for animals. Point with your hand open. Hong Kong Chinese are very superstitious: mentioning failure, poverty or death risks offence. · Remember Arabs are not used to being told what to do Visitors from the United Arab Emirates can take great offence if you appear bossy. They appreciate being looked after by staff who have been trained to understand Arab culture. For example, it is culturally insensitive to ask an Emirati whether they want bacon with their eggs or to include a half bottle of wine with the table d'hote menu. · Do not be alarmed if South Africans announce that they were held up by robots To a South African the word robot means traffic lights. ''Takkies'' means trainers, a barbecue is a 'braai', and ''howzit'' is an informal way of saying hello. When in a social situation with a South African do not place your thumb between your forefinger and your second finger - it is an obscene gesture. · Don't ask a Brazilian personal questions Steer clear especially of such issues as age, salary, or marriage to someone from Brazil, Argentina's fierce rival. · Avoid physical contact when first meeting someone from India Being touched or approached too closely in initial meetings can be considered offensive, even if the intention is entirely innocent or friendly. Be tolerant if Indians at first seem impolite, noisy and impatient. This is partly the result of living in chaotic cities and environments. They usually appreciate orderliness when they see it. · When meeting Mexicans it is best not to discuss poverty, illegal aliens, earthquakes or their 1845-6 war with America Polite topics of conversation would be Mexican culture, history, art and museums instead. When demonstrating the height of something, be aware that holding the palm face down is reserved for animals. Burping out loud is considered very rude. · Never call a Canadian an American Canadians may take offence if labelled American. Some Canadians get so annoyed about being mistaken for US citizens they identify themselves by wearing a maple leaf as pin badge or as a symbol on their clothing. · Do not take offence if an Australian or a New Zealander makes a joke about ''Poms'' It is more of a friendly endearment than an intended insult. · Avoid saying ''thank you'' to a Chinese compliment Instead, politely deny a compliment to show humility. If you compliment a Chinese person, expect a denial in reply. The Chinese are famous for communicating by "Saying it without saying it." You will have to learn to read between the lines. Use only black and white materials for presentations, as colours have significant meanings in Chinese culture. · When accepting thanks Koreans will typically say "No, no " The remark should be interpreted as "You are welcome". · Don't snap your fingers if you are with a Belgian. It may be interpreted as impolite And avoid discussing personal matters or linguistic and political divisions within Belgium between Dutch and French speakers. · Never imply Poles drink excessively Despite stereotypes, Poles are not large consumers of alcohol and excessive drinking is frowned upon. Sandie Dawe MBE, Chief Executive Officer of VisitBritain, said: ''Overseas visitors spend more than £16 billion a year in Britain, contributing massively to our economy and supporting jobs across the country. "So giving our foreign visitors a friendly welcome is absolutely vital to our economy. With hundreds of thousands of people thinking of coming to Britain in the run up to the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012, this new advice is just one of the ways that VisitBritain is helping the tourism industry care for their customers - wherever they come from.''

Etiquette Guide for the 2012 Olympic Games

If you plan on heading to London for the 2012 Olympic Games here are a few Etiquette Rules taken from an article written by the BBC The national tourism agency has developed a comprehensive online resource to guide everyone from hoteliers to cab drivers in offering the best customer service and meeting ‘cultural’ needs. It offers advice ranging from how to pour wine for Argentinians to not winking at people from Hong Kong. The big no-no is asking a Canadian [...]

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Shoulder Surfing during an interview_social etiquette

Manners Monday; What would you do: A potential employer asks for your Facebook password?

Today's Monday Manners Scenario has to do with Facebook and a potential new job. As of May, the unemployment rate is 8.2% with Nevada, Rhode Island and California the only three make money online states whose unemployment rates are in the double digits.  After months of sending out resumes and interviewing, you finally have a job offer.  When you meet with the hiring manager to finalize the details of your deal, the hiring manager asks you to go to the computer [...]

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Etiquette Tip — Small Talk Faux Pas

It is hard to believe summer is here.  With the summer get-togethers comes meet­ing new peo­ple and  mak­ing small talk here are some top­ics to stay away from… Inap­pro­pri­ate Subjects: Per­sonal issues such as fam­ily & health Reli­gion Pol­i­tics Salary Inti­mate Relationships Death Sales (Do not try to  sell some­thing to some­one you have just met) Off Color Jokes Gos­sip Would love to hear your Small Talk Faux Pas stories. Jules Hirst is a sought after speaker and a rec­og­nized eti­quette coach.  She con­ducts lec­tures, work­shops, sem­i­nars and webi­na­rs  in busi­ness, social & wed­ding eti­quette she [...]

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Facebook Breakup Etiquette

Here is a great arti­cle where 200 teens from the Boston area gath­ered to dis­cuss face­book breakup breakup eti­quette.  Par­ents now would be a great time to enroll your teen, pre-teen in an eti­quette course.… just a thought. Late last month, 200 teenagers from Boston-area schools gath­ered to dis­cuss the minu­tia of Face­book breakup eti­quette. Should you delete pic­tures of your ex after split­ting up? Is it O.K. to unfriend your last girl­friend if you can’t stop look­ing at her [...]

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Even The Well-Educated Need Etiquette Lessons

Don’t let this hap­pen to you. Here is a video of a self pro­claimed “well-educated” woman get­ting into an argu­ment with a Metro North Conductor. The woman boarded the New York bound train last week in West­port, and was appar­ently speak­ing loudly on her cell phone and using pro­fan­ity. When the con­duc­tor asked her to stop using pro­fane lan­guage, the woman replied, “I was not curs­ing. Excuse me, do you know what schools I’ve been to and how well-educated I am?” Here [...]

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Sean Diddy Combs Hires Etiquette Expert

Rap Mogul P. Diddy has hired eti­quette expert Dawn Bryan to give his employ­ees at Bad Boy Records a les­son on social niceties. Ms. Bryan report­edly taught the staff how to hold chop­sticks, present a busi­ness card in Japan, choose wine, hold a wine glass, eat caviar and how to select appro­pri­ate busi­ness gifts. All new employes at Bad Boy Records will now be required to take an eti­quette lesson.

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